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The myth of the 183 days

Tax residence can be a difficult concept, in particular if one has many residences.

Johnny Hallyday is a French rock star, who died at the end of last year. In fact, he was Belgian but became the French rocker of all rockers, made millions and moved to Switzerland for tax reasons.  In 2013, he took up residence in Santa Monica, California. When he died, it came to light that he had opted for the law of California in his will. By doing so, he could give his entire estate to his wife and disinherit his children but that is another story.

During his lifetime, questions were asked about where he had his real tax residence. He moved between his properties in Gstaad (in the Swiss Alps), Saint-Barthélemy in the Antilles, Marnes-la-Coquette (to the east of Paris) and Santa Monica. He said he was a US tax resident because he lived there for more than 183 days a year … And when he died in France, his wife returned to Santa Monica to make sure she was there more than 183 days a year.

It is a common misunderstanding that you are a tax resident in a country because you live there for at least 183 days. It is not because you live 183 days or more in one country that you have your tax residence there. And it is not because you live more than 183 days outside Belgium that you do not have your tax residence in Belgium.

There simply is no 183 days’ rule to determine tax residence

It is true that some countries take the position that you are resident for tax purposes if you live there for more than 183 days per year. That is a residence test to catch out taxpayers who say they are not resident. And some countries even go further. E.g. in the UK, the 183 days spent in the country are just the first automatic residence test. Even if you spend 91 days in the UK, you can be deemed to be a UK resident.

Nevertheless, it is not because you pass the residence test that you stop being a resident in the country you are leaving.  It is not because the UK considers that you are a tax resident that you stop being a tax resident in Belgium.

Belgium does not have a 183 days’ residence test.

Your residence is where you have your principal place of residence or the centre of your social and/or economic interests. Your principal residence is your home, it’s where you come home to. In the old days, we used to say “it’s where you have your dog, your slippers and where you get your newspaper”. It’s the centre of your interests in life (as opposed to your economic interests) and the seat of your fortune.

The Belgian tax authorities can assume that you are resident in Belgium if you are registered with the commune and have an identity card. This is only a first indication of your residence. You can still prove that you do not have your residence in Belgium.

For married people things are a bit more complicated. The law clearly says that they are living with their family. And there is nothing you can do to contradict that. However long a spouse may be living abroad, if his family stays behind, he remains a Belgian resident.

What this means is that you may try to live somewhere for 183 days or more per year, but that you still have your tax residence in Belgium. And that can be a recipe for disaster; if you have two tax residences, you have to declare your worldwide income in both countries.

Double tax treaties

Fortunately, there are double tax treaties that determine where a person is resident if they are deemed to be resident in two countries.

There are a number of criteria to determine that and 183 days is never one of them.

E.g. in the double tax treaty between Belgium and the United Kingdom, article 4 deals with residence:

ARTICLE 4 Residence

(1) For the purposes of this Convention, the term “resident of a Contracting State” means any person who, under the laws of that State, is liable to tax therein by reason of his domicile, residence, place of management or any other criterion of a similar nature; it also means, in the case of Belgium, companies (other than companies with share capital) which have elected to have their profits subjected to individual income tax. However, this term does not include any person who is liable to tax in a Contracting State in respect only of income from sources in that State.

(2) Where by reason of the provision of paragraph (1) of this Article an individual is a resident of both Contracting States, then his status shall be determined as follows:

(a) he shall be deemed to be a resident of the State in which he has a permanent home available to him; if he has a permanent home available to him in both States, he shall be deemed to be a resident of the State with which his personal and economic relations are closer (centre of vital interests)

(b) if the State in which he has his centre of vital interests cannot be determined, or if he has not a permanent home available to him in either State, he shall be deemed to be a resident of the State in which he has an habitual abode;

(c) if he has an habitual abode in both States or in neither of them, he shall be deemed to be a resident of the State of which he is a national;

(d) if he is a national of both States or of neither of them, the competent authorities of the Contracting States shall settle the question by mutual agreement.

The criteria are – in order of importance – :

  • a permanent home in one state;
  • a centre of vital interests (i.e. closer personal and economic relations with one state);
  • a habitual abode in one state;
  • the nationality of one state;
  • if all else fails, the tax authorities have to come to an agreement.
Why are people convinced that there is a 183 days’ rule?

In part that is because other countries have a 183 days’ residence test. It is also because there is a 183 days’ rule somewhere else in the double tax treaty. That is the provision that determines where you pay income tax on your remuneration if you live in one country and work in another.

In principle, you pay tax in your country of residence, not in the country where you work, except:

  • if you worked there 183 days or more in a year, or
  • if you were paid by a local company, or
  • if you were paid by the local branch of a company.

It is only if you meet one of these conditions that you pay tax in the country where you work, and then only for the days you work in that country. If you live in Belgium and work in France for a French company, you pay tax in France but only for the days you work in France. If you work at home on Fridays, or if you have to take a business trip to the UK, your income for those days is not taxable in France but in Belgium.

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Comments 35

  1. I am a UK residence with US citizen ship, I own and operate my UK limited company and wish to do work for a company in Belgium. Does the fact that a UK limited company can send its employees to any EU company it has a contract with to carry out work allow me as a UK residence working for my limited company, to work for a Belgium company?

    1. Post
      Author

      refer to your message of a few days ago on taxation.be

      You are a US citizen and you are living in the United Kingdom.
      You have your own UK limited company and you wish to do work for a company in Belgium.

      The free movement of workers, (i.e. the right to move to another EU country to work without a work permit) is a right for EU nationals. As a non-EU national, you may have the right to work in an EU country (Belgium)
      – if you are married to an EU national or
      – if there is a special agreement between your country of nationality (the US) and the EU to give you equal rights – there isn’t;
      – if you are a long-term resident of the EU (i.e. if you have been (legally) living in the UK for at least five years without interruption.

      I do not know if you would qualify under the first or third condition.

      Moreover, after 29 March 2019 (hard Brexit – which in my view is unavoidable now) you could not rely on the EU rules (unless you are married to an EU national who is not a UK national).

      This means that to come and work in Belgium, your company would need to apply for a work permit and a residence permit like any US citizen to come and work in Belgium.

    1. Post
      Author

      Dear Mr Pujdak,

      Thank you for your comment on the website.
      We are talking about two different 183 days rule.

      The topic of the post relates to a 183 days rule to determine whether someone is a Belgian resident rather than a German, Dutch or French resident.

      The page of the Dutch belastingdienst does not refer to residence; to the contrary it relates to someone who is without a Dutch resident working in Belgium. That 183 days rule (in the double tax treaty between Belgium and the Netherlands) determines whether he has to pay tax on his remuneration for work in Belgium or in the Netherlands. That is addressed in this post as well under “double tax treaties”.

      I trust this clarifies the situation.

      Best regards,

      Marc Quaghebeur

  2. Hi there!

    Thank you for writing this article, it was incredibly insightful. Information on these matters is limited and what is available can be difficult for a layman to understand.

    I have a few of questions that I’m hoping to get some answers to…

    Hypothetically….

    1. You have a UK, US and now Belgian citizen after living in Belgium for the last 5+ years. The last 1/2 years they worked as a self-employed person who got all their work from a UK company (involved travel to the UK about 3-4 times a month usually, and all invoices were made in £ and paid in £ to a UK account)… Would that have any impact on where the tax should be paid? I.e. Live in belgium, pay social security in Belgium and been filing taxes in belgium but work/payment comes from a UK company.

    2. Said person also owns an apartment in Belgium which is currently rented out. They move to the UK for work and give up Belgian residency for over 1 year (becoming a UK resident). They then move back to Belgium for 6 months to work on secondment in the Belgian office. During these 6 months they live and are registered at their apartment in Belgium (it is no longer rented out) but still have a lease on an apartment in the UK at the same time. What are the tax implications… Is it UK or Belgian taxes that are paid? Is there any way to ensure it is UK taxes not Belgian? e.g. spend more time in the uk.

    3. If said person moves back to the UK for 6 months or so after those 6 months in Belgium, but stays registered at their apartment in Belgium as they come back a weekend a month or so but living predominantly and working in the UK during those 6+ months… Where is the tax paid?

    I hope that makes sense. Many thanks in advance for your help!

    1. Post
      Author

      Dear Mr / Mrs Waite,

      Thank you for your comment on my article and I apologise for the delay in replying.

      Let me answer your questions, but I must admit that the questions are a bit leading.

      1. You have a UK, US and now Belgian citizen after living in Belgium for the last 5+ years. The last 1/2 years they worked as a self-employed person who got all their work from a UK company (involved travel to the UK about 3-4 times a month usually, and all invoices were made in £ and paid in £ to a UK account)… Would that have any impact on where the tax should be paid? I.e. Live in Belgium, pay social security in Belgium and been filing taxes in Belgium but work/payment comes from a UK company.

        Said person lives and work in Belgium, pays his social security in Belgium and works part time for a UK company.
        He is a Belgian resident.

        He is not an employee, so the special rules to determine where an employee is liable to income tax (the so-called 183 days’ rule) do not apply.

        Working as a self-employed for a UK company with invoices in £ and being paid in £ does not make a self-employed Belgian resident liable to UK income tax. Under the double tax treaty between Belgium and the UK, one is only liable to income tax in the UK if one has a permanent establishment in the United Kingdom.

        A permanent establishment usually means one’s own office (with the name above the door) or even a dedicated office within the client’s premises, but even hot-desking within the client’s premises can be a permanent establishment. However, the situation is not always very clear.

        This may mean that tax is due in the UK for the days worked in the UK.

      2. Said person also owns an apartment in Belgium which is currently rented out. They move to the UK for work and give up Belgian residency for over 1 year (becoming a UK resident).

        This is clear: upon deregistering with the commune said person has become a UK resident and as such is fully liable to tax in the United Kingdom even for work in Belgium.

        The question is where is he staying : what is the UK accommodation : an apartment he rents in the UK (see below)?

        Another question is: what is the family situation?

        And moving to the UK means opting out of Belgian social security and into the NHS.

      They then move back to Belgium for 6 months to work on secondment in the Belgian office. During these 6 months they live and are registered at their apartment in Belgium (it is no longer rented out) but still have a lease on an apartment in the UK at the same time.

        What do you mean with “move back for six months”:

        – what happens to the UK accommodation? It is still leased but nobody lives there? Is that not expensive?

        – who are “they” : just the “said person” or also the family ? You have not mentioned the family situation?

        – what is “move” back: register with the commune as is obligatory under Belgian law?

        – and why would they “move back” if they want to be resident and work in the UK? Why do they need a Belgian residence?

      What are the tax implications … Is it UK or Belgian taxes that are paid? Is there any way to ensure it is UK taxes not Belgian? e.g. spend more time in the UK.

        Is the question not rather: “how can said person be deemed to be resident in the UK and be considered resident in the UK rather than in Belgium”?

        This is what I explained in the article: you must make sure that you keep meeting the criteria for residence in the UK rather than in Belgium.

      3. If said person moves back to the UK for 6 months or so after those 6 months in Belgium, but stays registered at their apartment in Belgium as they come back a weekend a month or so but living predominantly and working in the UK during those 6+ months… Where is the tax paid?

        This moving residence between both countries can only confuse the Belgian and the UK tax authorities, and it is a recipe for disaster. If said person remains registered with the commune in Belgium, the Belgian tax authorities may consider he is registered here, and they may even disregard the 12 months in the United Kingdom.

        The question is really: what does “said person” really want: be considered resident in the UK, work there and work a bit in Belgium and pay social security and tax in the United Kingdom. This is possible but that raises quite a few questions:

        – what is the benefit? How much tax and social security does said person save?

        – moving to the UK means opting out of Belgian social security and into the NHS. Post Brexit, this means that there may be no social security benefits in the EU …

      I trust that this answers all your questions and that you will not hesitate to contact me should you have any further questions.

      Please note that this does not replace legal advice that takes account of the complete situation of “said person”

      Best regards,

      Marc Quaghebeur

      1. Hi Marc,

        Thank you for taking the time to respond – I have just seen your reply. I have answered your questions below. All of your advice is much appreciated!

        1. You have a UK, US and now Belgian citizen after living in Belgium for the last 5+ years. The last 1/2 years they worked as a self-employed person who got all their work from a UK company (involved travel to the UK about 3-4 times a month usually, and all invoices were made in £ and paid in £ to a UK account)… Would that have any impact on where the tax should be paid? I.e. Live in Belgium, pay social security in Belgium and been filing taxes in Belgium but work/payment comes from a UK company.

        Said person lives and work in Belgium, pays his social security in Belgium and works part time for a UK company.
        He is a Belgian resident.
        He is not an employee, so the special rules to determine where an employee is liable to income tax (the so-called 183 days’ rule) do not apply.

        Working as a self-employed for a UK company with invoices in £ and being paid in £ does not make a self-employed Belgian resident liable to UK income tax. Under the double tax treaty between Belgium and the UK, one is only liable to income tax in the UK if one has a permanent establishment in the United Kingdom.

        A permanent establishment usually means one’s own office (with the name above the door) or even a dedicated office within the client’s premises, but even hot-desking within the client’s premises can be a permanent establishment. However, the situation is not always very clear.

        This may mean that tax is due in the UK for the days worked in the UK.

        **I did not have a permanent establishment in the UK so looks like paying Belgian tax was my only option. Thanks for clarifying this.

        2. Said person also owns an apartment in Belgium which is currently rented out. They move to the UK for work and give up Belgian residency for over 1 year (becoming a UK resident).

        This is clear: upon deregistering with the commune said person has become a UK resident and as such is fully liable to tax in the United Kingdom even for work in Belgium.
        The question is where is he staying : what is the UK accommodation : an apartment he rents in the UK (see below)? **Yes, an apartment that is rented

        Another question is: what is the family situation? **I have no partner or children

        And moving to the UK means opting out of Belgian social security and into the NHS.

        They then move back to Belgium for 6 months to work on secondment in the Belgian office. During these 6 months they live and are registered at their apartment in Belgium (it is no longer rented out) but still have a lease on an apartment in the UK at the same time.

        What do you mean with “move back for six months”:
        – what happens to the UK accommodation? It is still leased but nobody lives there? Is that not expensive? **I would be on the lease but sublet the apartment whilst I am in Belgium

        – who are “they” : just the “said person” or also the family ? You have not mentioned the family situation? **I am single

        – what is “move” back: register with the commune as is obligatory under Belgian law? **Yes, I would register

        – and why would they “move back” if they want to be resident and work in the UK? Why do they need a Belgian residence? **Because I need to legally be registered at some point in my apartment within 2 years of purchasing it, as it has been rented, I have not lived in it yet

        What are the tax implications … Is it UK or Belgian taxes that are paid? Is there any way to ensure it is UK taxes not Belgian? e.g. spend more time in the UK.

        Is the question not rather: “how can said person be deemed to be resident in the UK and be considered resident in the UK rather than in Belgium”?
        This is what I explained in the article: you must make sure that you keep meeting the criteria for residence in the UK rather than in Belgium.

        3. If said person moves back to the UK for 6 months or so after those 6 months in Belgium, but stays registered at their apartment in Belgium as they come back a weekend a month or so but living predominantly and working in the UK during those 6+ months… Where is the tax paid?

        This moving residence between both countries can only confuse the Belgian and the UK tax authorities, and it is a recipe for disaster. If said person remains registered with the commune in Belgium, the Belgian tax authorities may consider he is registered here, and they may even disregard the 12 months in the United Kingdom. **Understood – it is better to be a resident in the UK after the 6 months then, and pay tax there.

        The question is really: what does “said person” really want: be considered resident in the UK, work there and work a bit in Belgium and pay social security and tax in the United Kingdom.

        **I need to be a resident in Belgium at some point in the near future due to my apartment. However, as I am moving back and forth, I am hoping there was some small miracle that would allow me to fall under the UK tax regime rather than the Belgian during the time that I am a resident in Belgium seeing as I am going between the two countries over that 12 month period. I received an €8,000 tax bill for 2018 despite only earning just over €27,000 as a self-employed person + an additional social security bill of €3,000 and paying this will clear out my savings. In the UK this would have been a £2,900 tax bill. I was hoping there would be a way to avoid this happening again so I don’t lose more of my savings. However, looks like this is not possible.

        This is possible but that raises quite a few questions:

        – what is the benefit? How much tax and social security does said person save?

        – moving to the UK means opting out of Belgian social security and into the NHS. Post Brexit, this means that there may be no social security benefits in the EU … **It stays the same during the transition period, but after 2020 that may change. Maybe with coronavirus the transition period will be extended, but who knows at this point!

        I trust that this answers all your questions and that you will not hesitate to contact me should you have any further questions.

        Please note that this does not replace legal advice that takes account of the complete situation of “said person”

  3. I’m considering going freelance and opening up a Limited Company. I’m a UK citizen but my clients would be Belgian. Where is best to open my company? *I have no obligation to reside in either country.

    1. Post
      Author

      Dear Elizabeth,

      Thank you for your message on this post.

      If you live in the UK, it would make most sense that you use a UK company, you can invoice clients from the UK, you have accountants there who can do your accounting there, file VAT and income tax returns and help you through the entire process. The company income tax rate is 19%, and when the company pays you a dividend, the net dividend would be liable to income tax at your ordinary income tax rates com are starting at 20%. The company can pay you a salary and you would pay social security / national insurance contributions as well as income tax on that salary.

      If you live in Belgium, it would make most sense that you use a Belgian company rather than a UK company or you would waste a lot of time / effort to run a company from the UK with UK accountants. Moreover, the Belgian tax authorities could always say that your company is actually a Belgian resident company.

      The advantage is that he situation (post Brexit) is clear, you invoice your clients from Belgium, you have Belgian accountants here who can do your accounting here, file VAT and income tax returns, etc… The company income tax rate in Belgium is 25% (but 20% on the first €100,000), and when the company pays you a dividend, that dividend would be liable to income tax at a flat rate of 30% (the company would have to withhold the tax when paying the dividend at a flat rate of 30% – you do not have to declare that dividend in your personal income tax return any more. The company can, however, reserve the profit of the year in a liquidation reserve – with a view to winding up the company – and pay a lower tax rate (10%), but that also allows you to reduce the 30% to about 14-15% (after 4-5 years).

      The company can pay you a salary and you would pay social security contributions as well as income tax on that salary.

      The situation with a UK company is more difficult:

      • the UK has a VAT threshold of £85,000 which means that you only charge VAT when you invoice more than £85,000 per year, but your EU clients will want a VAT number to reverse charge the VAT;
      • a UK company must invoice Belgian clients with 20% VAT except if the client has a VAT number;
      • in Belgium, the VAT is 21%, but your professional clients can recover the VAT;
      • after the Brexit transition period, the UK will be outside the EU and then you do not charge VAT anymore outside the UK but we do not know how this would work for the UK. The UK may impose that you charge UK VAT anyway.
      • we also do not know what trade agreement the UK will have with the EU : the government want a free trade agreement which is good for sales but not for services. We do not know how this may affect you.

      I hope this answers some of your questions and that you will not hesitate to contact me should you have any further questions.

      Best regards,

      Marc Quaghebeur

  4. Hi Marc,

    thank you for the insightful article. May I run another hypothetical case by you.
    in a dutch BV we are about to win a contract with a company in Brussels. The actual work will be performed by a Spanish national and citizen, whom I will hire via the company he works for in Spain. He regularly returns home (avg once a month) as this is his “home”. He will stay in a leased apt in Brussels and he will be working for more than 183 in Belgium. Where is this person tax liable? In Belgium, as that is where he will perform his job, in Netherlands as the BV hires him for the work or in Spain as a spanish national?
    And how can he prevent double (triple?) taxation?

    Many thanks

    1. Post
      Author

      Dear Frank,

      You are welcome.

      This raises a number of questions

      Is this his own company ? if so, he as the company director would be a permanent establishment of the company in Belgium and the company would be liable to corporate income tax in Belgium. (art 5 § 5 double tax treaty between Belgium and Spain :

      Indien een persoon niet zijnde een onafhankelijke vertegenwoordiger op wie paragraaf 6 van toepassing is voor een onderneming werkzaam is en in een overeenkomst­sluitende Staat een machtiging bezit om namens de onderneming overeenkomsten af te sluiten en dit recht aldaar gewoonlijk uitoefent, wordt die onderneming, niettegenstaande de bepalingen van de paragrafen 1 en 2, geacht een vaste inrichting in die Staat te hebben voor alle werkzaamheden welke deze persoon voor de onderneming verricht, tenzij de werkzaamheden van die persoon beperkt blijven tot de in paragraaf 4 vermelde werkzaamheden die, indien zij met behulp van een vaste bedrijfsinrichting zouden worden verricht, die vaste bedrijfsinrichting niet tot een vaste inrichting zouden stempelen ingevolge de bepalingen van die paragraaf.

      If he is an employee who cannot sign contracts on behalf of the Spanish company, then we need to look at which of the two countries, his state of residence (Spain) or the state where he works (Belgium) can tax.

      Art 15 § 1 says : if he works in Belgium, only Belgium can tax for the days worked in Belgium

      Onder voorbehoud van de bepalingen van de artikelen 16, 18, 19 en 20 zijn lonen, salarissen en andere soortgelijke beloningen verkregen door een inwoner van een overeenkomstsluitende Staat ter zake van een dienstbetrekking slechts in die Staat belastbaar, tenzij de dienstbetrekking in de andere overeenkomstsluitende Staat wordt uitgeoefend. Indien de dienstbetrekking aldaar wordt uitgeoefend, mogen de ter zake daarvan verkregen beloningen in die andere Staat worden belast.

      Art 15 § 2 says Spain can tax if the following three conditions are met

      Niettegenstaande de bepalingen van paragraaf 1 zijn beloningen verkregen door een inwoner van een overeenkomstsluitende Staat ter zake van een in de andere overeenkomstsluitende Staat uitgeoefende dienstbetrekking slechts in de eerstbedoelde Staat belastbaar, indien:

      a) de verkrijger in de andere Staat verblijft gedurende een tijdvak of tijdvakken die in enig tijdperk van twaalf maanden een totaal van 183 dagen niet te boven gaan, en
      b) de beloningen worden betaald door of namens een werkgever die geen inwoner van de andere Staat is, en
      c) de beloningen niet ten laste komen van een vaste inrichting of een vaste basis, die de werkgever in de andere Staat heeft.

      This means that he is taxable in Spain if

      a. he works less than 183 days in Belgium ; AND
      b. he is paid by a non Belgian employer ; AND
      c. his pay is not a tax deductible cost of a permanent establishment the employer has in Belgium.

      If you turn that upside down this means that he is liable to tax in Belgium if:

      a. he works more than 183 days in Belgium over any period of 183 days ;
      b. he is paid by a Belgian employer ; OR
      c. his pay is a tax deductible cost of a permanent establishment the employer has in Belgium.

      If you say he will work more than 183 days in Belgium, he will pay tax in Belgium as a non-resident. The Spanish company will have to pay withholding tax in Belgium (social security will be due in Spain).

       Double taxation is prevented because in Spain he will declare his total remuneration and he can deduct the Belgian tax from the Spanish tax (article 23 & a double tax treaty between Belgium and Spain)

      The Netherlands cannot tax his income.

      I trust that this is self-explanatory and that you will not hesitate to contact me should you have any further questions.  

      Best regards, 

      Marc Quaghebeur

  5. Hi Marc,
    I am a Belgian/UK citizen and Belgian tax resident . If I sign a contract with a UK employment agency to work less than 183 days for example in France for a French end client should I pay tax in Belgium or France as I am paid by the UK agency and return home each weekend . I am registered as an independent in Belgium

    1. Post
      Author

      Hello Andrew,

       You are a Belgian resident working in France as a self-employed.

      The UK is irrelevant here. Having UK citizenship or having a UK “employment” agency does not mean that tax is due in the UK – you will invoice the UK employment agency I assume which in turn will invoice the French client.

      The 183 days’ rule is only for employees.

      You will have to declare your income in Belgium.

      However, your income is taxable in France if you have a permanent establishment there (see art 5.1 of the double tax treaty between Belgium and France.

      What constitutes a permanent establishment is to be found under article 4.3.

      Generally speaking, it is the office that you set up in France to provide services to French clients, which you will not do. However, it can also be the office your French end client puts at your disposal. And even if you are hotdesking, the tax authorities can take the point of view that that is a permanent establishment.

      Keep in mind that if you work through a permanent establishment, you will pay tax in France on a half year’s income (at the lower tax rates) and in Belgium on a half year’s income at the tax rates on a full year’s income. The effect may be to average down your taxes in Belgium.

      I trust that this is self-explanatory and that you will not hesitate to contact me should you have any further questions.  

      Best regards,

      Marc Quaghebeur

  6. Hi Marc,

    Really nice article!

    I see many confusion between people on how to calculate these 183 tax days. For example, if a person enters Belgium on 13/01/2019 and stays until 24/01/2019 is this than 12 days (both arrival and departure date are counted) or 11 days (in case either arrival or departure are not counted)? Weekends are included that is what I understand.

    In my case, I was regularly flying back and forth between Belgium and Serbia (non-EU country) to work on a project in Belgium, via my Serbian employer. My permanent residence is in Serbia where I pay taxes on my salary (I’m a regular employee). There is also a double-tax treaty between Belgium and Serbia. My Serbian employer at that time paid taxes (from my salary to Serbia, as before).

    I was working in Belgium for almost two years (2017 and 2018), expected to receive letter to report taxes in Belgium, didn’t receive it and therefore assumed I’m not liable to pay taxes there, and now there are Inquiries (via my Serbian employer at that time) from ministry of finance about my taxes (in 2017 I didn’t have residence card in Belgium was always in hotels, in 2018 I had and a registered address there, not for the entire year though).

    I now plan to calculate my days in Belgium (not completely sure how, therefore my first question) and than contact Ministry of Finance to sort it out. Before that I would like to know if I’m liable to pay taxes and I assume it will only be determined based on those 183 days (if I’m above or below).

    Btw, in these taxable 183 days we calculate only days in Belgium, not days in other EU countries (since I’m not from EU country and there’s a free Schengen area which is more or less hard to determine where a person was)?

    Thanks a lot in advance!

    1. Post
      Author

      Dear Mile,

      There is confusion because people are not reading the text of the double tax treaty between Belgium and their home country. 

      The 183 days are calculated as either 183 days in a calendar year. In the double tax treaty between Belgium and Serbia, that is the case, so that you can have 182 days in 2017 and 182 days in 2018 and still not be liable to tax. Newer double tax treaties calculate on the number of days in any period of 12 months, starting on the first working day.

      These 183 days are days of physical presence in Belgium. Both the day of arrival and the day of departure count. 13/01/2019 to 24/01/2019 is 12 days (you were physically present in the country for 12 days) and weekend count.

      Your employer may have been correct to pay tax for you in Serbia, but you cannot rely on the fact that you did not receive a letter from the Belgian tax authorities to assume that that is correct. You are supposed to know your tax obligations and file an income tax return if you are working more than 183 days.

      Moreover, the 183 days rule is just the easiest to remember, but that is not the only rule.  You are liable to tax in Belgium if you meet (at least) one of the following conditions

      (a) you work 183 days or more in Belgium over any period of 183 days;

      OR   (b) your remuneration is paid by, or on behalf of, a Belgian employer ;

      OR   (c) your salary is a tax deductible cost of a permanent establishment (like an office or a branch) that your employer has in Belgium.

      Even if you were here less than 183 days, you may have been working for a Belgian company and you may have been taking instructions from your local boss, and your Serbian employer will have charged your remuneration back to the Belgian company (that is condition (b).

      The Belgian tax authorities find out about your work in Belgium when they audit the Belgian client.

      But I see that you are saying that you had a registered address in Belgium, this means normally that you declare you were a Belgian resident and therefore liable to tax because you were living and working in Belgium. You can prove you were really resident in Serbia, but that is more complicated.

      I cannot say whether you are liable to tax in Belgium, I do not have enough information, but the way the questions are asked may be an indication.

      The 183 days in Belgium are – indeed – only the days of presence in Belgium, but do not think you can say that you were somewhere else in the Schengen Area. What would you have done there if you fly in and out of Belgium to work in Belgium?  Are you saying that you took a lot of city trips on work days that your Serbian employer has invoiced to the Belgian company?

      I will be posting about “ten myths about the 183 days rule”. Look out for that.

      All the best

      Marc Qiuaghebeur

  7. Hi Marc,

    Thank you very much for this explanation. Just so that we are clear, do you know if we’ll need to pay tax in Belgium in the following scenario?

    I am an employee and the director of my UK registered limited company. I live in the UK.

    My company has a contract with a UK company (work agency). My company invoices the agency for work carried out (see below). The agency has a contract with a client based and registered in Belgiam (client). This client pays the agency for work I carry out for it.

    I am required to be on-site in Belgium to carry out my work for this client. Currently, it has not been more than 182 days on site. How is the 182 days calculated in this scenario? Is it per UK tax year? I usually leave on Monday evening from UK to Belgium, and return back to the UK either on Thursday or Friday evenings. I usually work for the client from the UK on Mondays before I travel in the evenings and any Fridays where I travel back to the UK on Thursdays. I also work certain weeks for the client from the UK.

    Does the fact that my company’s contract and gets paid by a UK company mean I don’t need to pay tax in Belgium even if i’m there for more then 182 days?

    Many thanks

    1. Post
      Author

      Dear Abdul,

      Thank you for your email but the 183 days’ rule does not apply to your situation, at least not directly.

      First of all, let there be no mistake : the fact that you are paid in the UK or that your company is contracted by a UK company is irrelevant. We are dealing with a cross border situation between the UK and Belgium and the only criteria are where you live and where you work.

      If you are an employee and the director of your UK registered limited company, there are two issues

      [1]

      If you, as the company director, work for the company in Belgium, you are a permanent establishment of the company in Belgium and the company would be liable to corporate income tax in Belgium. (art 5 (5) double tax treaty between Belgium and the UK).

      (5) Notwithstanding the provisions of paragraphs (1) and (2) of this Article, where a person — other than an agent of an independent status to whom paragraph (6) of this Article applies — is acting on behalf of an enterprise and has, and habitually exercises, in a Contracting State an authority to conclude contracts in the name of the enterprise, that enterprise shall be deemed to have a permanent establishment in that State in respect of any activities which that person undertakes for the enterprise, unless the activities of such a person are limited to those mentioned in paragraph (4) of this Article which, if exercised through a fixed place of business, would not make that fixed place of business

      If the company has a permanent establishment in Belgium, it is liable to income tax in Belgium in accordance with article 7 (1) of the double tax treaty between Belgium and the UK :

      (1) The profits of an enterprise of a Contracting State shall be taxable only in that State unless the enterprise carries on business in the other Contracting State through a permanent establishment situated therein. If the enterprise carries on business as aforesaid, the profits of the enterprise may be taxed in the other State but only so much of them as is attributable to that permanent establishment.

      The company is, therefore, liable to Belgian corporate income tax because you work here. This means it will have to declare the net profit it makes in Belgiu

      [2]

      As for yourself, you are a company director and that means article 16 of the double tax treaty between Belgium and the UK applies.

      Directors’ fees and other similar payments derived by a resident of a Contracting State in his capacity as a member of the board of directors or other similar organ of a company which is a resident of the other Contracting State may be taxed in that other State.

      In relation to remuneration of a director of a company derived from the company in respect of the discharge of day-to-day functions of a managerial or technical nature, the provisions of Article 15 of this Convention shall apply as if the remuneration were remuneration of an employee in respect of an employment and as if references to “employer” were references to the  company.

              The second sentence refers back to article 15. What does article 15 say :

      (1) Subject to the provisions of Articles 16, 18 and 19 of this Convention, salaries, wages and other similar remuneration derived by a resident of a Contracting State in respect of an employment shall be taxable only in that State unless the employment is exercised in the other Contracting State. If the employment is so exercised, such remuneration as is derived therefrom may be taxed in that other State.

      (2) Notwithstanding the provisions of paragraph (1) of this Article, remuneration derived by a resident of a Contracting State in respect of an employment exercised in the other Contracting State shall be taxable only in the first-mentioned State if:

      (a) the recipient is present in the other State for a period or periods not exceeding in the aggregate 183 days within any period of 12 months; and

      (b) the remuneration is paid by, or on behalf of, an employer who is not a resident of the other State; and

      (c) the remuneration is not borne by a permanent establishment or a fixed base which the employer has in the other State.

      Yes, we do get back to the 183 days’ rule, but the 183 days’ rule is actually a triple rule and it is written in the negative. You are liable to tax in Belgium if you do not have any of the following three links with Belgium : (a) you are less than 183 days in Belgium, (b) you are working for a non Belgian employer AND (c) you remuneration is not borne by a permanent establishment of your employer in Belgium.

      When we turn that around, you are liable to income tax in Belgium if you meet one of the following three conditions

      (a) You work 183 days or more in Belgium in any period of 12 months.

      That is not the calendar year, not the UK tax year, but any period of 12 months starting from the day you first work in Belgium until the day before one year later.

      (b) Your remuneration is paid by an employer who is a Belgian resident.

      This means basically that you work for a Belgian employer (you are under the authority of a boss in the Belgian company) and that the Belgian employer pays your remuneration directly to you, or that he pays it to your employer at home who sends him invoices for your salary.

      OR … WAIT FOR IT …

      (c) Your remuneration is borne by a permanent establishment of your employer in Belgium

      Remember, we said before that you are the permanent establishment of your employer in Belgium (see above article 5(5) of the double tax treaty). If your remuneration is borne by that permanent establishment, i.e. if your remuneration comes out of the income of that permanent establishment and reduces its profit and taxes, you are liable to income tax in Belgium.

      How many days you are working in Belgium, day, ten days, hundred days, less or more than 183 days … , does not make any difference. You pay tax in Belgium because you receive a salary from the work done in Belgium.

      However, you can chose to pay less personal income tax and more corporate income tax by taking a low salary and leaving more profit to be taxed in Belgium, or you can take more salary and pay less corporate income tax in Belgium on the profits of your company;

      Please note that this is not legal advice, this is just my reading of the rules in the double tax treaty between Belgium and the UK and my understanding of your situation.

      Best regards, 

      Marc Quaghebeur

  8. I have a UK based Limited Company offering education services. I am considering a consulting contract to be interim director of an international school in Belgium. This would be a six month, 110 – day contract requiring me to live in Brussels during the period August 2020-January 2021, returning to London periodically in that time but based at the school. There may be an opportunity to renew the contract for a further six moths, February -July 2021.

    Will I be able to pay UK corporation tax, or will I be liable for Belgian tax instead or in addition?

    1. Post
      Author

      Dear Clarissa,

      The answer is similar to the one I gave Abdul on 28 February.

      If you invoice through the company, you will pay UK corporate income tax.

      However, the company will have a permanent establishment in Belgium and will be liable to income tax in Belgium as well.

      A permanent establishment usually is an office or a building site, but it can also be the director of a personal services company. See Article 5.5 of the double tax treaty between Belgium and the UK that mentions a person who “is acting on behalf of an enterprise and has, and habitually exercises an authority to conclude contracts in the name of the enterprise”.

      If the company has a permanent establishment in Belgium, then it is liable to tax in Belgium on the income it makes here. This means it will have to file a corporate income tax return in Belgium and pay Belgian corporate income tax.  The tax is due on gross income minus expenses in Belgium. The tax rate is 25%, but 20% on the first €100,000.

      In the UK, you will have to file a corporate income tax return as well and pay tax on your worldwide profits. The tax rate is 19% but should go down to 18%.  The UK grants you relief for double taxation under Article allows you to set off the Belgian corporate income tax against the UK corporate income tax, see Article 23.1.a) :

      Belgian tax payable under the laws of Belgium and in accordance with the provisions of this Convention, whether directly or by deduction, on profits, income or chargeable gains from sources within Belgium (excluding, in the case of a dividend, tax payable in respect of the profits out of which the dividend is paid) shall be allowed as a credit against any United Kingdom tax computed by reference to the same profits, income or chargeable gains by reference to which the Belgian tax is computed;

      This means that you will not pay 19% or 18% but 20% on the net income in Belgium and 19% or 18% on the net income for your work in the United Kingdom.     

      However, if you draw a salary from the company, part of that salary, i.e. the part of the salary that you receive while you work in Belgium, is liable to income tax in Belgium.

      Article 16 deals with company directors, but paragraph 2 refers to Article 15 (income from employment).

      If you are more than 183 days in Belgium (in any period of 12 months) which seems to be likely, your remuneration will be liable to tax in Belgium.

      However, even if you are in Belgium less than 183 days, your salary for work in Belgium will be liable to tax in Belgium because the remuneration is borne by a permanent establishment of your company in Belgium. And we have just concluded that your personal services company has a permanent establishment in Belgium.

      If you personally must pay income tax in Belgium, you can deduct (or credit) the Belgian tax against the tax in the UK. You would pay less tax in the UK.

      It may even be more advantageous to simply get paid outside the company, but the company will allow the international school not to pay Belgian social security.

      If you want to discuss this, please feel free to contact me directly, just click on my name under the article.

  9. Hi Marc
    Very insightful – thank you.
    I have been looking into a proposal to work for a company based in Switzerland. However, I would potentially work one day a week from home and fly back to Belgium on Friday late afternoons.

    I already figured out that if I work for 25% or more in Belgium I will be subject to Belgium Social Security. I have also figured out that for the time I work in Belgium I will have to pay Belgian taxes.

    However, is there a rule book on the practicalities of how this works? I heard stories of people taking evening flights (from the UK in that case) so they land in Belgium after midnight etc.

    I have been searching for more details but I cant seem to find anything really concrete, just the double taxation treaties and general remarks.

    Thank you very much in advance.

    1. Post
      Author

      Hi Roel,

      There are no rule books on how you can legally circumvent the tax and social security rules. This is what HR departments and tax lawyers do for a living in advising the employee in his situation. However, you should know that the approach is different for social security and tax.

      For the social security, your employer has to meet his obligations as an employer and if you are liable to social security in Belgium under Regulation (EC) 883/2004, he has to register in Belgium and pay the social security.

      For tax, as a Belgian resident, you have to file an income tax return as a Belgian resident, and you claim the exemption for the days you worked in Switzerland (NOT the days you worked outside Belgium, e.g. at HQ in the US !!!). If you claim the exemption, the Belgian tax authorities will ask you to prove that you are entitled to the exemption and to prove which days you worked in Switzerland. This is for you to prove – and you better keep a very accurate set of documents (flights, hotels, meetings in Switzerland, etc). If you want to read the tax authorities’ view, check Circulaire nr. AFZ 2005/0652 (AFZ 08/2005) dated 25 May 2005 or the Comments on the OECD Model Tax Convention.

      You cannot compare with the UK, that is for people who try to prove they do not have a residence in the UK and must not stay in the UK more than 91 days per year.

      This is not legal advice and must not be relied on etc etc .

  10. Hi Marc,
    Your article is very interesting, I have read all the information but I still don’t fully have my head wrapped around it all and how it might apply to my own situation so I am hoping you can shed some light. I am employee of a company based in Cyprus, however they can send me to projects anywhere in the world. I work on a rotation of 6 weeks on 4 weeks off. This year for the 6 weeks I am assigned to a project in Canada and for the 4 weeks I live in Brussel with my husband ( not working) . My company pays my taxes in which ever country the project is in but does not cover my tax whilst I reside in Belgium. I am working in Canada for more than 183 day does that mean that I am exempt from paying tax in Belgium or in fact do I still need to pay tax for the days spent in Belgium?

    Thank you very much

    1. Post
      Author

      Thank you, Charlotte, that is most kind.

      Let’s start with the beginning: you live in Belgium and you must report all your income in Belgium.

      If you receive a remuneration from another country, that remuneration may be liable to tax there.

      The fact that your employer is in Cyprus, sends you out from Cyprus and pays you from Cyprus is irrelevant.

      If you work on / off on assignments in Canada, the remuneration you receive for work in Canada is taxable in Belgium if you are “present in the other State (Canada) for a period or periods not exceeding in the aggregate 183 days in any twelve-month period commencing or ending in the fiscal year” (article 15 of the double tax treaty between Belgium and Canada).

      In other words, it is taxable in Canada if you are present in Canada for 183 days or more in any period of 12 months.  “Present in Canada” is not “present outside Belgium” but really present in Canada and not in e.g. in the US. You have to take out days traveling in other countries.

      If you are six weeks in Canada, that is 40 – 42 days (depending on when you arrive or leave). You can fit five periods of sxi weeks in a year. That will be at least 5 x 40 or 42 days = 200 or 210 days. You probably are present in Canada for more than 183 days.

      We must make a distinction as to whether you work in Belgium when you are not on assignment.

      • If you are working in Belgium, your remuneration is for work in Belgium and in Canada. 
        Only the remuneration for work in Canada is exempt. 
        210 calendar days out of 365 is 57.53%, 160 working days out of 220 working days in Belgium is 72.73%. 
        You have to calculate these days carefully and then you can deduct a percentage of your salary, let’s say 70%.
      • If you are not working in Belgium, all of your remuneration is for work in Canada and is completely tax-exempt in Belgium.
        You mention that you are not working in Belgium. You then have to declare your remuneration minus social security contributions (where do you pay these?) and the tax paid in Canada in code 2250-78 and you must claim the exemption on page 3, “Partie 1 – Cadre IV.O”.

      However, if you claim a full exemption, it is more than likely that the Belgian tax authorities will question why the total remuneration is tax-exempt. How do you prove that you are not working?

      You state that you are not working in Belgium, but unless you work as a lumberjack in Canada, that may be difficult to prove. Are you paid for the six weeks in Canada and not for the 4 weeks in Belgium? Does your employer calculate the Canadian tax on part of your remuneration or on your entire remuneration?   

      For any help with filing your tax return see the brochure, which you will find here or see the Bulletin website.

       

  11. Hi Marc,
    Thank you for you reply. To answer your questions, my contract is very clear that I work on a 6 week on 4 week off rotation so my contract would have to be my proof should I ever get questioned about whether I do work whilst in Belgium’, also there is no incentive for me to work on the 4 weeks. Note that when I’m working I am working 6 weeks straight with no day off so the 4 weeks are my weekends with a bit extra. My employer pays me a monthly salary and throughout the whole year and pays any taxes required for me work on the project I am assigned. They just don’t cover my tax owed in my country of residence. Regarding social security, this is something I have been trying to sort out as I just received my Belgium residency card. My husband is trying to add me to his at the moment however there is also a lot of queries into my working situation.

    Thank you
    Charlotte

  12. Hi Marc
    If you are working eg 80% in the work state, 10% within Belgium and 10% elsewhere, my understanding is you would be taxed on 20% of your revenue in Belgium, in the context of the “progressievoorbehoud”.

    My understanding is that basically your taxes are calculated on your net foreign income as if your income was being taxed in Belgium and then the amount of tax payable is pro-rated for the % you would actually be taxed in Belgium.

    But what happens with the tax breaks (both the tax free sums and the tax deductions)? Are they both already taken into account during the calculation of the theoretical tax on the full income or applied afterwards only on the part that is actually taxable in Belgium?

    1. Post
      Author

      Hello Roel,
      The quick answer is that most deductions are taken into account in the calculation of the theoretical tax on your full income.
      If you are working 80% in the work state, 10% in Belgium and 10% elsewhere, 20% of your income is liable to tax in Belgium. The 80% is tax exempt with progression. This means that the 20% is taxed at the theoretical average tax rate that would apply to 100% of the income.
      How do the Belgian tax authorities do that?
      They start with the 100, first they deduct the business expenses and the “quotient familial” / ”huwelijksquotiënt”; that is part of your salary that is deducted and is taxed in the hands of your spouse or partner). They also deduct any maintenance you may have paid.
      Then they calculate the theoretical tax on your worldwide income.
      The personal allowance and the allowance for children are next, the tax that would be due on these is calculated and that tax is deducted from the theoretical tax on your worldwide income.
      It is only at this stage that the tax for overseas income is calculated. The tax authorities take 80% of the tax that has been computed and deduct that.
      In other words, all allowance and deductions are calculated on your worldwide income, not just on your Belgian income.
      It is only the federal incentives (e.g. for gifts and pension savings) and the regional incentives (e.g. for your mortgage that are deducted from the tax on your Belgian income (the 20%).
      This is quite theoretical, but I would recommend that you put your figures in Tax-Calc. You can make an anonymous calculation of the figures in your tax return.

  13. HI Marc, this article was really helpful, thank you and for taking the time to answer everybody’s questions. I’m still very confused and worried though so I’d be grateful for your advice.

    I am British but I left the UK in 2013 when I went to live in Portugal. In 2015 I bought a home there and was working there. In December 2018 I went to the US to do a paid internship, returning in June 2019. I didn’t declare any of that income in Portugal or the US (I’m still not sure if I needed to, it was about 1400 dollars a month). In September 2019 I left Portugal for a temporary job in Belgium and I changed my address with the Portuguese tax authority to my Belgian address, with the intention of making Belgium my tax residence. Due to waiting for an appointment at the commune, and then moving house before finishing the police visit, then the coronavirus… essentially I re-registered my address with the Belgian commune in July and I am waiting to complete the police registration process now to be officially registered at the commune for the first time.

    A Portuguese accountant, and the Portuguese tax authorities told me if I didn’t earn anything in Portugal in 2019 I don’t need to declare my taxes there even though I own a home there. The Portuguese authorities said as I changed my tax address in September 2019 to a Belgian address I don’t have to declare my Belgian earned-income from after that. But when I called the Belgian tax authorities they said that because the process of registering with the commune still isn’t complete, I am also not registered as resident here so at the end of 2020 I will have to make a non-resident tax declaration for my 2019 income. But if I am not considered as resident here for that period, and the Portuguese government also doesn’t consider me resident there… then where am I supposed to pay the tax and what do I do?

    I am so grateful for your advice. Thank you.

    1. Post
      Author

      Dear Anonymous,

      I see that you are putting the question to the Portuguese and Belgian tax authorities in terms of “where am I resident if I am not officially registered in your country”.  It is only normal that you get an answer in terms of official registration. However, that has nothing to do with where you are resident. It can be an indication of where you want to be resident, but it does not have to.

      The real question is : where do you consider home: Portugal or Belgium. You have a house in Portugal, you have furniture there, maybe a car, a mobile phone with a Portuguese phone number, … Did you move all your furniture, all your clothes to Belgium? Did you get a Belgian phone number instead of your Portuguese phone number, etc to come to work in Belgium in a temporary job?  Or did you arrive here with a suitcase or two and a laptop?

      How temporary is temporary? One year, two years, … ? What do you plan to do afterwards? What did you tell your family: “I am moving to Belgium; it will be easier to come and see me?” or “I have temporary job in Belgium.”

      From what you write, I understand that you have moved to Portugal to live there and after your internship in the US, you came back to Portugal. I guess that when the temporary job in Belgium is over, you will move back to Portugal.

      In that case, you are a resident of Portugal and a non-resident in Belgium.

      However, a one year can turn in to a longer period of residence (I have known clients who came for a year and are still here 35 years later).  And then you become a resident of Belgium and a non-resident in Portugal.

      I read that you write “I changed your address with the Portuguese tax authority to my Belgian address, with the intention of making Belgium my tax residence”. You probably did that to keep things simple and limit the number of tax returns to one.

      In that case, why are you asking where you are a resident. You are living in Belgium and I suppose you did not go back to Portugal during the confinement. And if you are resident here, you should have filed a tax return in Belgium for your income between September and December.

      That you have not received a tax return is only because you are still not registered. You cannot use that as an excuse. If you do not receive a tax return when you are a Belgian resident, you have to ask for one. 

      In your Belgian tax return, you will have to declare your September to December income as well as a rental value for your property in Portugal. You will not pay tax on it as it is exempted in Belgium. Belgium exempts the overseas income but that the Belgian tax authorities will take account of this exempted income to determine the tax rate that applies to any income that is taxable in Belgium. In effect this pushes the Belgian income in the higher tax brackets.

      As for your paid internship between December 2018 and June 2019, during that time you remained a resident of Portugal. You were working in the US and if you stayed there for 183 days or more in that period, then you were liable to tax in the US. It is likely that you were there for 183 days, unless you took a month’s leave at Christmas (see article 16 of the double tax treaty between Portugal and the US). I don’t know whether that was enough income to have to pay tax in the  US.

      As for Portugal, Article 25 of the double tax treaty says that you have to declare the income in Portugal, that you pay tax on everything (Portuguese and US income in 2018, or Portuguese and US income in January to September 2019), and that you can deduct the tax you paid in the US. If you did not pay tax in the US, the deduction will be 0.

      I hope that this answers all your questions and that you will not hesitate to contact me should you have any further questions.

      1. Hello again Marc,

        I really can’t thank you enough. This has been a big weight on my mind and I’m extremely grateful to you for taking the time to give some advice. I called the Belgian tax authorities again and they said to complete the process of registering with the police/commune and then after I have the card to submit a tax declaration for September-December 2019 online as a resident even though I’m still not registered with the commune (I’m exempt from doing so because of my employer unless I choose to). I earnt about 8760 dollars between December-June 2019 in the USA.

        I have a couple of other questions. I am thinking of supplementing my income by giving language classes online to some former students in Portugal. If they are based there and the money would be paid to my Portuguese bank account would I declare it here in Belgium as income earned here or in Portugal? If my students were to pay the money to my account in Belgium would that make a difference? If I do this job as a self-employed person would I have to register here as self-employed in addition to being employed by my company?

        I will also do a part-time research job online for a UK company in September (employed by the UK company), so again, would that be considered Belgium earned income or foreign earned income? I don’t want to have to do a tax declaration in 4 countries. (I still have my full time job in Belgium).

        Thank you again – I really cannot thank you enough.

        1. Post
          Author

          The answer is simple: you are doing the work here, not in Portugal, not in the UK, so the income is liable to tax in Belgium.
          If you work as a self-employed, you have to pay social security contributions as a self-employed, but you can pay low contributions if you register as a self-employed with his main occupation as an employee (see here). And you must register for VAT, even if the threshold for paying VAT is €25,000 (see here).

          1. Hello again Marc,

            Thank you again for your help. After spending a week trying to learn about tax things are beginning to make sense! I was trying to understand why the Portuguese accountant told me I didn’t need to file a tax declaration there for 2019 if my income wasn’t earnt there whilst doing my internship, even though she knows I own a house in Portugal. I think she was maybe thinking of the 183 days rule and the idea that I became a tax resident in the USA due to being there more than 183 days? (she never explained why). But in my case, I was in America on a NATO-6 visa, and I think different rules apply to us? So is it right that the 183 days or more in the USA never counted for tax residency purposes at all, so as you originally said I was always a tax resident in Portugal and definately should have declared my American income (from NATO) there? I earnt about 7200 dollars from my internship there in 2019 and 900 in 2018, so I don’t think I ever crossed the threshold for paying tax in the USA. Thank you again.

          2. Post
            Author

            Dear Anonymous,
            It is no use trying to understand why the Portuguese accountant told you that you did not need to file a tax return in Portugal for 2019; the quickest solution is to simply ask her rather the speculating.
            That you were in America on a NATO-6 visa, that is also new, but a visa is an authorisation to enter the country, not a tax exemption. This is a question for the agreements signed between NATO and its Member States. There are a number of treaties that deal with taxes due by NATO staff, but as you were an intern, the safest solution is simply to ask NATO.
            Sorting out these questions is what we do but we need proper instructions and information from you.
            I trust that this answers all your questions and that you will not hesitate to contact me should you have any further questions.

  14. Dear Marc,

    Thank you very much for this article. It is very helpful. I would like to ask your advice on the following. I am Greek and moved to Belgium in 2015. I have been working for the private sector ever since. I am a resident, have been registered to the commune and pay my taxes in Belgium. In March 2020 and due to the COVID-19 outbreak I left Belgium to come to Greece to be close to family and friends. I continue working for the same company and I continue paying rent for my apartment in Belgium. Am I required to come back to Belgium before I complete 183 days in Greece or outside Belgium? Is there any new rule that has been issued specifically concerning the COVID-19 pandemic and working online from another country while being taxed in Belgium?

    Thank you very much in advance for your help.

    Best wishes, Katerina

    1. Post
      Author

      Dear Katerina,

      Thank you for your kind email.

      The double tax treaty between Belgium and Greece states that you are liable to income tax in Greece for your work in Belgium. It is only if you are present in Belgium for 183 days that you are liable to tax in Belgium.

      Because of Covid-19, many people who come to work in Belgium have to stay in their country of residence and work from home.  This means that they cannot meet the conditions to be liable to income tax in Belgium.

      The Belgian tax authorities have signed an agreement with the neighbouring countries, France, GermanyLuxembourg and the Netherlands about the 183 days rule in Corona times. The days spent in lockdown – from the middle of March to the end of May or June – are not considered days worked at home but days worked at the employer’s premises. The days worked at home in these countries count as days in Belgium and for Belgian residents who normally work in France, Germany, Luxembourg or the Netherlands are not days worked at home in Belgium. In the meantime, the agreements with the Netherlands and Luxembourg have been extended until the end of the year.

      Unfortunately for you, there are not enough Greek residents working in Belgium for the Belgian tax authorities to sign a similar agreement with Greece. If you are not working and living at least 183 days in Belgium, your remuneration will be liable to tax in Greece.

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